Tomatoes and the Adventures of Congressional Vegetable Rulings

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What’s in a Name?

What is a vegetable, really? While the true meaning of the word has been argued for some time now, and culinary professionals define their foods a little differently than botanists or even customs officials, we all know the tomato has long been a candidate up for semantic debate.

 In 1893, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a customs case that the tomato is considered a vegetable, despite the knowledgeable conclusion of numerous botanists that a tomato (as well as corn, cucumber and bell pepper) is actually a fruit. This all stems (get it?!)  from the scientific taxonomy of biological classification, but my point is that it has definitively been decided by the USDA how many servings of vegetables Americans should be getting a day, and what these vegetables are is also, apparently, up the United States Government. 

But First, a Little History

The National School Lunch Program was signed by President Truman and established in 1946. The program came into effect because it became evident that malnourished children grew up to be very poor soldiers; this federally imposed meal program was imposed as a “matter of national security”.

school lunch

In 1966 the program went even further by passing the Child Nutrition Act to provide breakfast, milk, and special equipment for the school kitchens. The success experienced as a result of the National School Lunch Program inspired officials as they began to recognize the role of proper nutrition for brain development in our nations’s children.

However, this crusade seemed to lose momentum in the early 1980’s when the Federal School Lunch Program withstood a staggering  budget cut of 25%. This led to a number of decreases in quality and quantity, including substitutions and portion reductions. The USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service under the Reagan Administration actually encouraged states to explore such audacious options such as pickle relish as vegetable substitutions. Not surprisingly, this campaign, and Reagan himself were publicly smeared with the critique that condiments are not vegetables.

ketchup

So… Can Pizza Actually Be a Vegetable?

This brings me to more current regulations. Many people probably remember the public outrage in 2011 when the agricultural spending bill passed that failed to honor the attempts to enhance the nutritional content of school lunches.  The proposed changes included several things like limiting sodium and potato use on the lunch lines, and not counting 1/8th of a cup of tomato paste as a 1/2 a cup of vegetables. In other words, in order to get their full cup of veggies, kids will have to consume however much cheese and bread comes along with that tomato paste in the sauce. This lead to slew of headlines claiming that “Congress Declared Pizza a Vegetable”. 

Perhaps unfortunately for the general public, policies that are made in the name of nutrition are not always done so solely with the objective consideration and input of trained professionals. Things like cost and subsidies come into account when making these decisions, too. Dairy, meat and salt industries have a say in how much of these things we “should” actually eat. For instance, knowledge about the dangers of excessive sodium consumption have been abound for 30 or more years, but it’s been difficult to get the reduction many health professionals have been asking for, as salt is an efficient and cost-effective way to make food taste good, so the salt industry actually has a powerful sway. 

eatingwithunclesam

Back to the Tomato and Our School Lunches

Fresh fruits and veggies are pretty easily recognized by most anyone over the age of 4. However, some regulations and public policies make it a little more ambiguous as to how to count your servings. In light of these facts, the position of public policy for someone passionately interested in good food seems daunting and disheartening.

While there are community nutrition positions in government, it seems that fierce politicians rarely graduate from the nation’s dietetics and nutrition programs to go on a fight for nutritional legislature. Many big industries and companies seek out professionals who will lobby for their product, without giving an objective look at the nutritional value of their goods. However, without the nutritional advocacy of educated, unbiased professionals, our children would be very much at the mercy of budget cuts and the food industries, who quite frankly, don’t always have the nutritional content of our school lunches in mind. Without them, the future’s children may be scraping their “vegetables” from the inside of a salty can…

My gratitude goes out to those who fight for our nutritional standards, with our most healthy best interests at heart.

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The Bacon Renaissance: You Are What Your Friends Eat

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baconforpresident

Bacon Makes Everything Better..?

Over the past few years, bacon has made its way off of the breakfast table and into some completely unrelated areas of our lives. You’ll find it on T-shirts, bumper stickers, iPhone cases and other various, inedible novelty items. Additionally, it has appeared across the spectrum of our meals. Coffee shops boast bacon-flavored lattes, while menus of upscale restaurants feature chocolate-covered bacon, and I think we all know of the famed Maple Bacon Doughnut from Voodoo Doughnuts that even spawned a beer of the same flavor. So, is bacon the fad anti-diet?

Fadulous

Wikipedia defines diet faddism as, “idiosyncratic diets and eating patterns that promote short-term weight loss, usually with no concern for long-term weight maintenance, and enjoy temporary popularity”. Every generation sees some new and some of the same fad diets. Things like the Paleo Diet, Atkins Diet, and the Blood Type Diet have been around for several generations, but how much do these affect us?

Take into consideration the gluten-free craze. Although most people now know that these products began by offering options to those with Celiac Disease or wheat/gluten sensitivities, but it took the nation by storm. Hundreds of well known brands are now producing gluten-free items for the estimated 1% of the American population afflicted with Celiac Disease. This is just one of many things that has become a health trend for millions of Americans who want to live more healthful lives. It can be pretty easy to just jump on the bandwagon.. everyone is doing it.

You Are What Your Friends Eat

I moved to Bozeman three years ago, and although I’ve always been interested in nutritional health, I found myself among a lot more seasoned connoisseurs of healthful eating. This is mecca for vegan, granola, and local-foods-only consumers. It’s trendy to be healthy. I found myself eating a lot more foods from the organic section, and dining at the Co Op with my friends on a twice-a-week basis. When I leave town, I sometimes find myself indignant at the lack of variety in  restaurants and grocery stores. Whether or not I like to admit it, I’ve become one of them.

Most food trends have proven to be no different than most fashion trends in their transitory natures. They sweep through the population, appearing especially in certain demographics and peer groups. Celebrities are talking about them, restaurants are featuring them, and eventually, most will go the way of the mullet. The great fact of all these trends is this: they affect the way we eat. If you’re one of the folks that concedes to the notion that bacon makes everything better, then you’re likely eating it with more than just your eggs.

As a target population, while Americans have added 2 years to their life expectancy, they have not improved their status in the weight bracket in the last 10 years. In fact, the issue of obesity has only gotten worse. Interestingly, there has been some speculation  that weight gain can be “contagious“, with rising numbers making obesity, in a sense, socially transmittable. In other words, if your friends are overweight, you’re also more likely to fall into this category.

Who Controls the Food Trends?

While doing my research, I came across countless recipes, blogs and products catering to bacon lovers, from edible dishes made of bacon, to a Wikipedia page entitled, “Bacon Mania“. I had dinner at a downtown restaurant last week where the cornbread came with a whipped butter that was peppered with candied bacon. I also came across some interesting pages about annual food trends. Once again, I was reminded of the fashion industry, and the people who decide what’s going to be in style this year. It’s probably not the people who care about your wallet or self image. Similarly, the yearly food trends don’t likely conform to the views of the people who are looking out for the health of our nation. After all, we are living under the watchful eye of an industry that invites us all to choose the country’s new favorite flavor of potato chip.

Ultimately , these kinds of unhealthy trends are a nightmare for the community nutritionist. Bacon is certainly a good source of flavor, but it’s also a great source of saturated fats, preservatives and sodium. With heart disease being the leading cause of death in the United States, can our society really afford to endorse such foods?

Evolution-of-Obesity

Don’t get me wrong, this is certainly not an anti-bacon campaign. I have a fondness for this porky treat, myself. My point in all this bacon and fad diet talk is not just that social intake norms affect actual individual intake, but that many people make their choices with a lack of knowledge, following a sort of mob mentality, simply because it’s socially acceptable.

The community nutritionist’s job doesn’t just stop at forming policies or improving school lunches; they also educate their constituents about the food choices they’re making. Considering the notion that public health professionals aim to create an environment where people can thrive in a healthful manner, I think the experts could take into consideration the need to dismantle certain misconceptions about fad diets and trending foods, so that we can all make educated choices with how we’re eating. Because ultimately, it’s my choice whether I decide to put bacon bits on my frozen yogurt, not my community nutritionist’s.